Summer 2015 - Sunday, July 5, 2015 - 7:00 am MST

posted Feb 10, 2017, 6:17 AM by Ashley Lee
Sunday, July 5, 2015 - 7:00 am MST




















Myself and Peter Koncnik (Slovenia) on duty for the match. Do you like our ‘pink’ jackets?

Yeomju Gymnasium - Main Gym - seating 7,500. In this match Argentina vs Korea there were about 2500 spectators. Upper seats mainly empty but hopes they will fill up when play-offs occur. Main issue is that Korean Men will not advance to first 8, good chance that Korean women will finish 2nd in their pool and will advance to top 8. Not good for TV, many of the matches are been televised on Euro Sport in Europe and in local stations here in Korea. With no Korean men it might mean a lower crowd draw or TV sponsors will not be happy.

Today the good news is that Canada women beat Zimbabwe, very easily which is good. The bad news is that their next opponent Thailand beat Turkey 3-1 today. This means even if they beat Thailand it will come down to ties and then points as they will all have beaten Zimbabwe. Guess we shall see tomorrow. The Canadian men had a bye today.

As the standings go right now it seems that advancing to the Top 8 for men will be:
Pool A
Chinese Taipei
Czech Republic or Argentina 

Pool B
Russia
Iran

Pool C
Brazil
Japan

Pool D
Ukraine
Latvia or China

The other teams will still play and they will re-pool with those finishing 3 and 4th in their pool playing for 9-16. If Canada Men do not get hot in the next two matches they could be in the pool for 17-22. They would have to beat Switzerland to stay in the 9-16 pool. Switzerland played well, losing against Russia and Iran, but they were more competitive than Canada has shown to date. So Canada will have their hands full when they play Switzerland in their last match. On a small note George-Andre Carrell, from Switzerland, was my head of delegation many times when I was in Switzerland in the early 90’s. His son is playing for Switzerland in this competition.

Korea has two identical twins playing on their Men’s team, it is a good thing that they have different numbers on their shirts or if they change who could tell? On another note the two athletes that lit the torch on opening ceremony date were male athletes, although a few females were recognized in passing on the torch before it was lit. One the male athletes was a baseball player (yes baseball is a demonstration sport in these games), who later went on to play professional ball in the US major league. Why no female?

We have 40 international referees here to run all the matches. They have to take a rules exam in the beginning and pass above 70%. The international language for all participants is English. The problem is that about 8 referees do not understand English and had to write another exam to improve their scores. This does not mean that they are bad referees but does mean that communication on the court is in English. All the captains in the event are supposed to talk to the referees in English as the ‘working’ language. Both Canadian referees were in the 90’s. One Korean female referee scored 100%, not bad for a second language.

For the women and their standings it looks like be as follows:

Pool A
China
Korea

Pool B
Russia
Ukraine or Taipei

Pool C
Japan
Brazil

Pool D
Thailand
Turkey or Canada

The level of the teams here, overall, is the best that I have seen in the past 4 FISU competitions. For the women only Zimbabwe is of a lower level, although I have not seen Chile or Colombia yet. Korea is a bit of a disappointment for the women but then there are only 3 universities in Korea that have women’s teams. Most players here, if they play professional ball, are not in school.

As far as it goes for the Men there is no ‘non’ competitive teams. Yes there are some teams that are of a lower level but they are all strong representatives of their country and their level of volleyball is good. Lets hope we have some close matches as we conclude the round robin play and move into the play-offs.

Tomorrow I go to Palma which is the furthest competition from Gwangju - about 1 1/2 hours by car/bus. But at least I have women’s matches which should be good. FIN vs JPN, UKR vs TPE and not good TUR vs ZIM but it means we finish quickly and a better arrival time back in the ITO Village where we stay. It means I leave around 10 am and get back around 10 pm, as I do all 3 matches as Jury member.

On the 7th of July, Tuesday here, I have a nice match in Yeomju Statium (the main court), last one of the round robin and it could mean 1st place in that pool, RUS vs IRI Men.

Good night
잘 자 or jal ja

Lorne
론 
lon 
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